Stranger Danger

(Originally printed in the Summer 2004 Issue of the MCOI Journal ) When our children started school, we were introduced to the “Stranger Danger” program. With a growing concern about strangers abducting school children, we, along with most other parents, spent time talking with our kids about Stranger Danger. “Don’t talk to strangers.” “Walk in a group.” “Never get into a stranger’s car, or go anywhere with him—even if he says he knows your parents … Continue reading

The Church in Crisis

by Don & Joy Veinot & Ron Henzel (Originally printed in the Winter/Spring 2003 Issue of the MCOI Journal beginning on page 1) In a world awash in new religious movements—or what could properly be termed the “repaganization” of the world—Russell D. Moore raises a very important question regarding the future of the Church: …the questions over evangelical identity are not ultimately about turf wars over publishing houses or academic guilds. They are about one … Continue reading

Death by Mosquito

Ah, spring is in full swing. Flowers are in bloom, the trees have leaves, lawns are in full growth and, the dreaded mosquito is on the scene. Even as I thought about this last week, Joy and I were listening to an audio book while on our route to and from California. The book, A Rule Against Murder: A Chief Inspector Gamache Novel by Louise Penny . It is a well done murder mystery set … Continue reading

The Morphing of the 3 E’s

I became a Christian in the 1970s. This was a challenging and exciting time for me. I hadn’t grown up in the church and was by example (my father) and choice, an atheist prior to being persuaded of the validity and truth of the claims of Christianity. When I became a believer the Jesus movement was in full swing and the era of church trends seems to have been coming into its own. Being a … Continue reading

Extra! Extra! Social Scientists Discover Evangelicalism!

It seems that Sociology has finally started taking an interest in that amorphous moniker: “Evangelicalism.” I once had a sociologist friend describe sociology as the “Study of all things obvious.” Evangelicals have been around for a long time, but as Timothy Beal writes in the Chronicle of Higher Education: . . . [A]cademic studies of American evangelicalism and related movements have been fairly few and far between compared with those of other religious subjects—such as … Continue reading